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2014
Dec 2014 | Download as pdf

St. Cloud Surgical Center is First ASC in U.S. to Utilize Xenex Germ-Zapping Robot to Disinfect Operating Rooms & Enhance Patient Safety more

Dec 2014 | Download as pdf

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Dec 2014 | Download as pdf

Southern Biologics Network Established to Create Biologics Faster and Less Expensively more

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Morningside Ministries at the Manor is the First Skilled Nursing Facility in Texas to Protect Residents with Xenex Germ-Zapping Robot more

Dec 2014 | Download as pdf

RBA to cut rates in 2015: Still want to invest in term deposits? more

Nov 2014 | Download as pdf

Can robots help stop the Ebola outbreak? more

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Robots Help Fight Ebola more

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South Florida Hospital Unveils Ebola-Zapping Robot more

Nov 2014 | Download as pdf

Sonoma Valley Hospital uses robot to kill germs more

Nov 2014 | Download as pdf

Robots go to war against Ebola more

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UAB and SRI have plans to spinoff more success more

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iTraumaCare’s new CEO to help company secure new funding more

Oct 2014 | Download as pdf

U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley Adds Xenex Ebola-Zapping Robot to Inventory

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Standing at 5 feet 2 inches tall, U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley’s newest staff member doesn’t initially have a commanding presence. However, after five minutes, its impact has the potential to save countless lives around the world.

The 633rd Medical Group recently received a germ-zapping robot, nicknamed "Saul," which harnesses the power of technology to destroy viruses – including the Ebola virus. Shortly after the president issued an executive order addressing the critical issue of Ebola, the 633rd MDG responded with cutting-edge technology to protect the health of the service members, their families and the community. The hospital staff partnered up with Xenex Disinfection Services, the company that created Saul, as part of a response plan designated to ensure the 633rd MDG is equipped to handle viruses like Ebola.

“We are very proud to be the first Air Force hospital to acquire this robot for disease containment and Ebola virus preparedness,” said U.S. Air Force Col. Marlene Kerchenski, 633rd Medical Group Director of nursing services. “Saul will provide an extra measure of safety for both our patients and our intensive care unit staff.”

Xenex offers the fastest, safest, and most cost-effective method for the disinfection of healthcare facilities, such as patient rooms, ORs, and ICUs. Xenex robots quickly destroy the microorganisms that cause healthcare associated infections (HAI), such as Clostridium difficile (C.diff), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the Ebola virus. The Xenex germ-zapping robot works by pulsing xenon, an inert gas, at high intensity in a xenon ultraviolet flash lamp. This produces ultraviolet C (UVC), which penetrates the cell walls of microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, mold, fungus and spores. Their DNA is instantly fused so that they are unable to reproduce or mutate, effectively killing them on surfaces and in the air without contact or chemicals.

Although each room is cleaned by hospital staff wearing proper protection equipment and using cleaning chemicals, harmful bacteria, viruses and fungi still linger in some areas, especially those areas that human hands can’t reach. As an additional patient safety measure, the Xenex robot can then disinfect a room in five minutes and destroy Ebola-like viruses on surfaces in two minutes.
Saul is able to kill a single strand of ribonucleic acid, a virus similar to Ebola, two meters out in any direction, within five minutes at an efficiency rate of 99.9 percent, said Xenex representative Geri Genant. “Hospitals that are using Xenex’s robots have been able to bring C.diff, MRSA and other MDRO infection rates down in many cases by more than 60 percent,” she continued.

The Xenex technology will be used at Langley as a preventative measure to help eradicate and control viruses. The Xenex robot will primarily be deployed for the disinfection of patient treatment areas, including in-patient rooms, operating rooms, isolation rooms, intensive care units, and common use areas. In addition, the Xenex robot is available to provide decontamination in response to a natural or intentional biological event. Xenex supports the 633rd MDG’s medical readiness mission and provides an effective countermeasure to mitigate the risk of diseases such as Ebola from spreading.

Xenex robots can be used to disinfect all areas where an infected patient will be transported or treated (aircraft, ambulances, ambuses, hospitals and personal protective equipment - PPE). Healthcare workers are vulnerable when they are removing their contaminated equipment (gowns, gloves, masks) after treating an Ebola patient. Xenex robots can be used to quickly disinfect the PPE prior to removal so the workers are protected, which is a significant advancement in improving healthcare workers’ safety.

“The full spectrum UV technology in the Xenex robots directly supports the recently released Presidential Executive Order ‘Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria’ and would be an outstanding course of action for DOD Military Treatment Facilities (MTF) that were identified as needing to improve their infection prevention strategies by the SECDEF directed Military Health System Review,” said Mark Storey, vice president of government accounts for Xenex.

Xenex robots are considerably faster, safer and “greener” than other automated cleaning and infection control methods, including toxic mercury UV and hydrogen peroxide-based systems, which can take multiple hours to achieve the same level of disinfection. UV light has been used for disinfection for decades -- but not all UV light is the same. What sets Xenex apart is the robot's use of xenon (not toxic mercury) to create full spectrum UV light. Its patented technology is 25,000 times more intense than sunlight and hundreds of times more intense than mercury UV systems. This enables Xenex’s germ-zapping robots to disinfect healthcare facilities in a fraction of the time it takes for mercury bulb devices to disinfect rooms. The Xenex germ-zapping robot can disinfect a typical patient/procedure room in 5-10 minutes, as demonstrated in multiple peer-reviewed published studies. The only non-mercury UV room disinfection solution is provided by Xenex.

The video story can be viewed at http://www.jble.af.mil/news/video/index.asp.

About Xenex Disinfection Services
Xenex's patented pulsed xenon UV room disinfection system is a pesticidal device used for the advanced cleaning of healthcare facilities. Due to its speed and ease of use, the Xenex system has proven to integrate smoothly into hospital cleaning operations. The Xenex mission is to eliminate harmful bacteria, viruses and spores that can cause hospital acquired infections in the patient environment, and to become the new standard method for disinfection in healthcare facilities worldwide. For more information, visit www.xenex.com.

Contacts
Xenex Disinfection Services
Melinda Hart, 210-824-3433
melinda.hart@xenex.com

Source: http://www.businesswire.com back

Oct 2014 | Download as pdf

Forthcoming Acne Treatment Made With Exclusive (And Sustainable) East Indian Sandalwood Oil more

Oct 2014 | Download as pdf

Sonoma Valley Hospital Acquires Xenex Germ-Killing Robot to Enhance Patient Safety more

Oct 2014 | Download as pdf

Robot fights germs at Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center more

Oct 2014 | Download as pdf

Xenex updates protocols for germ-zapping robots in response to Ebola threat more

Oct 2014 | Download as pdf

How do we get rid of the endotoxins? Birmingham's  has the solution more

Oct 2014 | Download as pdf

Medical Device ® Positions New Leader for Next-Level Growth more

Oct 2014 |

The Xenex robot at South Shore Hospital featured on an Xploration Earth more

Oct 2014 | Download as pdf

Germ-zapping robot Gigi sets its sights on Ebola more

Oct 2014 | Download as pdf

Morningside Ventures leads a Series B round for DNAtrix more

Oct 2014 | Download as pdf

StemBioSys secures new research space at BioBridge Global more

Oct 2014 | Download as pdf

Birmingham's Soluble Therapeutics acquires Seattle company Dilyx Biotechnology more

Oct 2014 | Download as pdf

Company invents germ-zapping robot more

Sept 2014 | Download as pdf

Xenex Congratulates Houston Cancer Hospital more

Sept 2014 | Download as pdf

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Sept 2014 | Download as pdf

DNATRIX ANNOUNCES TREATMENT OF FIRST PATIENT WITH DNX-2401 more

Sept 2014 | Download as pdf

Targeted Technology raises more than $40 million more

Sept 2014 | Download as pdf

Reducing Healthcare Associated Infections (HAIs): Not All UV Light is the Same more

Sept 2014 | Download as pdf

Bluegrass Vascular Technologies Names Dr. Gabriele Niederauer President And CEO more

Aug 2014 | Download as pdf

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Aug 2014 | Download as pdf

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Aug 2014 | Download as pdf

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Aug 2014 | Download as pdf

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Aug 2014 | Download as pdf

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July 2014 | Download as pdf

Biotech firm secures nearly $5 million in funding, is relocating to San Antonio more

July 2014 | Download as pdf

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July 2014 | Download as pdf

Germ-Zapping Robots Fight C. diff and MRSA at Mercy Health Saint Mary's more

July 2014 | Download as pdf

Milford hospital enlists robots in war against infections more

July 2014 | Download as pdf

Xenex Testifies About UV Room Disinfection Technology Effectiveness to U.S. House of Representatives more

July 2014 | Download as pdf

Western Pa. hospitals test robot using ultraviolet rays to kill bacteria more

July 2014 | Download as pdf

Xenex Demonstrates UV Room Cleaning Systemís Effectiveness in Reducing Hospital Acquired Infections more

July 2014 | Download as pdf

TFS flags record full-year profit more

June 2014 | Download as pdf

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June 2014 | Download as pdf

House committee looks for new technology in Veterans Affairs hospitals more

June 2014 | Download as pdf

FDA grants fast track status to drug DNX-2401 for recurrent Glioblastoma more

May 2014 | Download as pdf

CEO shakeup at San Antonio biotech company StemBioSys more

May 2014 | Download as pdf

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Mar 2014 | Download as pdf

BiO2 Medical Enrolls Subjects in the New U.S. FDA Early Feasibility Pilot Study for the Angelģ Catheter more

Mar 2014 | Download as pdf

San Antonio biotech firm readies skin treatment for distribution more

Mar 2014 | Download as pdf

ViroXis Gets Approval To Initiate FDA Phase 2 Study For Molluscum Contagiosum more

Mar 2014 | Download as pdf

Medical technologies conference announces speaker lineup more

Mar 2014 | Download as pdf

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Feb 2014 | Download as pdf

Santalis Pharmaceuticals Signs Exclusive License Agreement with Global Pharmaceutical Company to Commercialize OTC Dermatology Products more

Feb 2014 | Download as pdf

ViroXis Corporation Signs Exclusive License Agreement with Global Pharmaceutical Company to Commercialize an OTC Dermatology Product more

Feb 2014 | Download as pdf

DNAtrix Awarded $10.8 Million Grant by the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas more

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ViroXis Corporation Achieves Key Clinical Milestones more

Jan 2014 | Download as pdf

There are growing concerns about the threat of an antibiotic crisis caused by the spread of drug-resistant superbugs. Those concerns could result in more